The PeaceHavens Project

Copyright 2022 © Ged Dodd

 aka PeaceHavens Project
Click here for the terms
of free copy & share &
supporting your Project

https://www.facebook.com/groups/PeaceHavens/ ..

 

LINKS TO EVERYTHING ELSE

 

Russian Flax and Hemp Bale Seals from

Konigsberg (King's Mountain)

  KONIGSBERG is the name for a former German city that is now Kaliningrad, Russia. Originally a Sambian or Old Prussian city, it later belonged to the State of the Teutonic Order. The literal meaning of Konigsberg is 'King’s Mountain'. Konigsberg joined the Hanseatic League in 1340 and developed into an important port for the south-eastern Baltic region, trading goods throughout Prussia, the Kingdom of Poland, and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. Konigsberg, the capital, became one of the biggest cities and ports of ducal Prussia, having considerable autonomy, a separate parliament and currency. While German served as the fief's official language, the city served as a vibrant center of publishing in both the Polish and Lithuanian Languages. The city flourished through the export of wheat, timber, hemp, and furs, as well as pitch, tar, and ash.

  From 1600 the flax trade from Elbing to the UK was significant but by 1650 their trade had shifted to Konigsberg.

    Konigsberg was one of the few Baltic ports regularly visited by more than one hundred ships annually in the latter 16th century, along with Danzig and Riga. During the Seven Years' War of 1756 to 1763 Imperial Russian troops occupied eastern Prussia at the beginning of 1758. On 31 December 1757, Empress Elizabeth I of Russia issued an ukase about the incorporation of Konigsberg into Russia. The extensive Prussian Eastern Railway linked the city to Breslau, Thorn, Insterburg, Eydtkuhnen, Tilsit, and Pillau. In 1860 the railway connecting Berlin with St. Petersburg was completed and increased Königsberg's commerce. Regular steamers plied to Memel, Tapiau and Labiau, Cranz, Tilsit, and Danzig. The completion of a canal to Pillau in 1901 increased the trade of Russian grain in Königsberg. The city was an important entrepôt for Scottish herring, in 1904 the export peaked at more than 322 thousand barrels. Jews flourished in this culturally pluralistic city.

  The finest Wilna flax was originally exported via Memel and Konigsberg until the arrival of the Edlykuhu railway whereupon it was all transported directly to Konigsberg. The city had Scots communities before 1500 and 3 voyages of flax was recorded being shipped to Montrose in 1689 before the introduction of leads bale seals.

       Oberland flax from an area in Switzerland came to the UK via Konigsberg and Elbing but was little esteemed in the British markets.

Vessel Ship Arrivals and Departures for Konigsberg Cargo
Providence 18-09-1677 Arrived Dundee from Konigsberg Flax
also from Konigsberg on 26-07-1675, 13-11-1676, 18-06-1678, 14-08-1680
Bruce 17-09-1822 Arrived Dundee from Konigsberg Flax
Wilhelmina 04-08-1831 Arrived Dundee from Konigsberg Flax Yarn

    In the 17th century nearly half of the trade in Flax and Hemp to the UK came from Elbing, Konigsberg, Narva and Riga. After 1660 our trade with Poland via Elbing and Konigsberg virtually ceased. Polish demand for our cloth almost disappeared due to their own industry growing, and being able to get much cheaper imports from Holland and with Russian products becoming more accessible. While naval stores and undressed flax were obtained from Narva, Reval or Riga, spruce linen yarn came usually from Konigsberg and Elbing.

   Treasury warrant (on an order in Council of the 18th November 1709.) to the Customs Commissioners to release from quarantine the ships "Kent", Fr. Oxon master; "Fortune", John Mattinson master; "William and Robert", Tho. Gibson master: from Konigsberg, Queensberg and Riga with flax, iron, hemp, sturgeon and bristles: on the petition of Thomas Pierson.

 Similarly, to discharge from quarantine the ships "Primrose", Robert Stones master; "Endeavour", Rt. Winright master: with iron and deals from Stockholm and Dantzic respectively: on the petition of Thomas Coor.

  The "Biddulph", Mich. Hales master, with iron, pitch and tar from Stockholm; "Thomas and Rober"t, Ra. Vaugh master, with flax and hemp from Konigsberg: on the petition of Ri.Tomlinson.
   "The Riga Merchant" and "Two Twins", with plank: on the petition of John Taylor.
The "Josep", John Young master, with flax and hemp from Konigsberg; "Friends’ Goodwill", Sh. Merriman master; "Blenheim", Th. Simonds master; "Isaac and Jonathan", Is. Rogers master; "Friendship", G. Hodgkinson master: with iron, deals, pitch and tar: on the petition of Alexander Patterson.

Copyright 2022 © Ged Dodd

 aka PeaceHavens Project
Click here for the terms
of free copy & share &
supporting your Project

 

LINKS TO EVERYTHING ELSE